TV & radio: what to tune in to next week (31 July-6 August)

Can't decide what programmes to watch or listen to? Here are 10 you won't want to miss...

Ripper Street
BBC One
Friday 31st July, 9.00pm

The Victorian-era crime drama, axed in 2013 by the BBC but resurrected in a deal involving Amazon Prime, returns to terrestrial TV for a third season with an episode that revolves around a train robbery. Also this week, the Bloomsbury set drama, Life In Squares, continues on BBC Two at 9.00pm on Monday 3rd August.

Find out more here.

 

Archive On 4: Cradle To Grave
Radio 4
Saturday 1st August, 8.00pm

The QEII hospital in Welwyn Garden City was the first purpose-built NHS hospital and opened amidst much publicity in 1963. Earlier this clear, superseded by a new facility, it closed to make way for housing. A documentary that considers the history of the NHS through the prism of the QEII’s story.

Find out more here.

 

Under The Mushroom Cloud
Radio 4
Monday 3rd August, 9.30am

Doctor Shuntaro Hida survived Hiroshima because he was called to a medical emergency six kilometres from the epicentre of where the US dropped an atomic bomb in August 1945. Now 98, he recalls the horrific events that led to the beginning of his life’s work: treating radiation victims.

Find out more here.

 

Women Of Terror
Radio 4
Monday 3rd August, 8.00pm

Bridgett Kendall, the BBC’s diplomatic correspondent, explores women who become terrorists and considers why their attacks seem to inspire more fear than those carried out by men. It’s a story that variously encompasses 19th-century Russian revolutionaries, the IRA, the Tamil Tygers and such individual figures as Palestinian hijacker Leila Khaled.

Find out more here.

 

Great Lives
Radio 4
Tuesday 4th August, 4.30pm

The series in which celebrities nominate favourite historical figures returns. First up, actor Sir Ian McKellen speaks up for up mountaineer Edmund Hillary. Also today, in Experiments In Living (Radio 4, 8.00pm), social historian Juliet Gardiner looks back at a post-1945 era when families clubbed together to buy big country houses, a way to share resources and childcare.

Find out more here.

 

Hunt For The Arctic Ghost Ship
Channel 4
Tuesday 4th August, 9.00pm

In 1845, under the command of Captain Sir John Franklin, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror headed to Arctic waters in search of the North-West Passage. Both ships were lost until, last year, Erebus was located on the ocean floor, upright and intact. A documentary that tells the story of her rediscovery, and of Franklin’s ill-fated expedition.

Find out more here.

 

Samurai Warrior Queens
Yesterday
Tuesday 4th August, 9.00pm

Nakano Takeko (1847-68) began her martial arts training when she was just six years old. In a docudrama exploring her life, we discover how Takeko grew up to lead a group of female fighters into battle during an era of civil war in Japan.

Find out more here.

Takeo leads her Samurai women into battle. (Credit: UKTV/Yesterday/SWQ Press)

 

Three Pounds In My Pocket
Radio 4
Wednesday 5th August, 11.00am

The series charting the experiences of first-generation immigrants from the Indian subcontinent returns with a programme devoted to 1968-76. These were years, as Kavita Puri charts, when immigration became a hot political issue and racist abuse was on the rise.

Find out more here.

 

Pick of the week

Buddha: Genius Of The Ancient World
BBC Four
Wednesday 5th August, 9.00pm

Bettany Hughes profiles the Buddha. It’s the tale of a man who abandoned both his family and his homeland as he sought to find a solution to human suffering, and whose teachings still shape the lives of millions of people. Subsequent documentaries in the series will focus on Socrates and Confucius.

Find out more here.

Bettany Hughes profiles the Buddha in the first episode of this series. (Credit: BBC/Tim Knight)

 

Decoding The Masterworks
Radio 4
Thursday 6th August, 11.30am

Art historian Janina Ramirez presents a series in which she looks at three great paintings in detail. She begins with Édouard Manet’s A Bar At the Folies-Bergères, an unsettling portrait of a barmaid, which was first exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1882.

Find out more here.

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